Links Between Core Collapse Supernovae and Star Formation Established

Links Between Core Collapse Supernovae and Star Formation Established

When massive stars accumulate more iron that they can hold, they explode in what is called a core-collapse supernova, also known as Type II supernovae. Such supernovae will enrich their surroundings with key elements, seeding them for the formation of other stars. Now, cosmologists and extragalactic astrophysicists have linked the number of core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) in a galaxy with the actual star formation rate (SFR). space science space core galaxies science study of space

typeii- space science space core galaxies science study of space

Maria-Teresa Botticella, at the Padua Astronomical Observatory, Italy, and her colleagues compared star-formation estimates, which was based on core-collapse explosions, to those on a conventional measurement of galactic brightness, based on Hα, far ultraviolet (FUV) and total infrared (TIR) galactic luminosities. space science space core galaxies science study of space

The CCSN rate provides a strong lower limit for the star formation rate. By adopting an estimate of the minimum stellar mass to produce CCSN, they determined a SFR from supernovae numbers. The supernova statistics also provide a constraint on the minimum stellar mass for their core collapse supernova progenitors. space science space core galaxies science study of space

Prev1 of 2Next